The best three severe weather apps for RVers

It’s always a good idea to keep a handle on current and future weather conditions, especially in the midst of spring’s severe weather season as RVers travel across the country in their first trips of the season.

That's where apps come in. There are hundreds of weather apps but for my PC Mike report for NBC-TV stations this week, I featre the three I think are the best.

WeatherBug is the one I personally use the most. It provides warnings and alerts about approaching severe weather along with a host of other weather-related information – like real-time forecasts, including current, hourly, and 10-day. WeatherBug provides alerts about severe weather, but goes further by plotting details about lightning strikes. The app is free for iOS an Android.

RadarNow is a no-frills app, and focused strictly on radar. You get a live loop of the latest radar data and can zoom in and details. Alerts issued from the National Weather Service are sent when bad storms are on the way. The app is free for iOS and Android, but requires an annual subscription fee of $3 after five days.

Radar Cast Elite gives notice of an oncoming storm at least one hour before it hits.  Users can look at map, satellite, and hybrid views, and use the app’s features to control things like speed of the radar sweep. The app also will send notifications to your device. The app is $2.99 for iOS and Android.

As I said, there are lots of weather apps. Feel free to share your favorites as a  comment below.





  • CaryA

    As a pilot for more than 44 years, I’m hooked on weather–it’s a necessary hobby. Although all of my flying now is recreational, I get my preflight and in-the-air weather primarily from ForeFlight, which is a relatively expensive aviation app, but probably the best, as it provides not only weather but all the aviation charts (as well as road maps) for the entire US. My particular subscription is $150/year, but worth every penny (having current paper charts used to cost me almost $400/year, and that was only for the western US). I supplement that with some free weather apps, Accuweather, MyRadar, and Deep Weather, but I could easily get along with just ForeFlight.

    Cary